Kittitas County Genealogical Society
Instructions
Do you have a good hint, tip, trick, fact, joke or other short tidbit that you would like to share?  Please email it to the webmaster for consideration.
 
We wish to thank the Lee County Genealogical Society (FLorida) for graciously allowing KCGS to copy their massive group of "Tips and Facts".  While KCGS will add to the tips and facts from Lee County from time to time, at this point the majority of information has been supplied by Lee County!
 
Content is quite large so be sure to open the "drop down" and select a category to minimize the amount of information displayed.  Also, that will filter the content to a specific category.
 
 
 
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Listings: 1 to 50 of 491
1.  
NewCan't find any male relatives who inherited your maternal grandfather's Y-DNA? Cast your net wider by climbing further up your family tree. See if that grandfather had brothers who had sons, or if his father (your great-grandfather) had brothers who had sons.
[Located in Category: DNA]
2.  
NewJoin the local genealogy society in the location where you are researching.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
3.  
NewDid you know that in the country music song "I've Been Everywhere" Kittitas County is mentioned as one of the places visited? Yes, the locality mentioned is our county seat town of ELLENSBURG! It is mentioned in the 4th verse. Check it out by Googling "I've Been Everywhere lyrics."
[Located in Category: Kittitas County Facts]
4.  
On January 29, 1977, "Roots," a groundbreaking television program, premieres on ABC. The eight-episode miniseries, which aired on Consecutive nights, follows a family from West Africa through generations of slavery and the end of the Civil War. (from "TIDBITS of Yakima County" newspaper, Issue 324, Yakima, WA)
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
5.  
The airport in Ellensburg is named Bowers Field in honor of Ellensburg native son Ensign Keith Bowers who died at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
[Located in Category: Kittitas County Facts]
6.  
Western artist John Ford Clymer (1907-1989) was born in Ellensburg. He painted more than 80 covers for the Saturday Evening Post and other magazines. The Clymer Museun in Ellensburg has many of his paintings in its gallery. Mr. Clymer and his wife Doris are buried in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF) Cemetery in Ellensburg.
[Located in Category: Kittitas County Facts]
7.  
Genealogy is incredibly personal.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
8.  
Genealogy is an incredible way to make a connection with the past.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
9.  
Historical societies vary in specialization, with focuses ranging from specific geographical areas such as countries or towns, universities, railways, ethnic and religious groups, to genealogy, pioneer history, and the preservation of antiques or historic buildings.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
10.  
A historical society is an organization dedicated to preserving, collecting, researching, and interpreting historical information or items. Originally, these societies were created as a way to help future generations understand their heritage.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
11.  
Some "one-namers" may restrict their research geographically, perhaps to one country, but to register a surname with the Guild a member must commit to researching on a world-wide basis.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
12.  
A one-name study is a project researching all occurrences of a surname, as opposed to a particular pedigree (ancestors of one person) or descendency (descendants of one person or couple).
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
13.  
Family organizations or associations centered on a more distant common ancestor are often referred to as "ancestral family associations," while those centered on a commonly shared surname are commonly referred to as "single surname family organizations".
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
14.  
A family association or family organization is formed by people who share a common ancestor or surname.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
15.  
Lineage societies are societies that limit their membership to descendants of a particular person or group of people of historical importance.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
16.  
Genealogy Society, which may be called a Family History Society in other countries, is a society, often charitable or not-for-profit, that allows member genealogists and family historians to profit from shared knowledge.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
17.  
Add Social Networking to Your Research.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
18.  
Understand the history of the area you are searching on.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
19.  
Look for places, not just people.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
20.  
Go beyond genealogy websites. Try county histories, biographies, etc.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
21.  
Make a list of what information you want to find.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
22.  
Prepare a Genealogical Memorandum to your Last Will and Testament to make arrangements where your research goes, other than the circular file.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
23.  
Prepare a storm protection program (i.e. weather conditions, fire, computer crashes, etc.) for your research.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
24.  
Expect to collect lots of papers.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
25.  
Learn how to "Google."
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
26.  
Read the terms and conditions of websites.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
27.  
Don't search websites only once and think that's all there is. Visit websites often for new information.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
28.  
Use Message Boards and Mailing Lists to find other family researchers.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
29.  
Don't believe everything on the Internet!
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
30.  
Join your local genealogy society. Take advantage of their special interest groups, workshops and other educational opportunities.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
31.  
Use Timelines to see the areas where you need to concentrate your research.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
32.  
Make copies of original documents for your files/binders and place the originals in a safe place.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
33.  
You are going to be collecting many papers and documents and you will need to determine what method of keeping track of your information works best for you.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
34.  
Get in the habit of jotting down memories.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
35.  
Prepare a list of questions that you might like to ask your family members about their lives.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
36.  
Our family memories are important. Don't let them be forgotten for the future generations in your family. Begin collecting these stories by writing down your memories today.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
37.  
Depending upon the time period, how you view the documentation and who provided it, you may find different dates, different name spellings and different locations.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
38.  
Why document your research? Helps to prevent duplication of research.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
39.  
Start with yourself and work backwards in your family tree.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
40.  
Look for alternative records for your research: Legal papers, Family papers, Personal items, Military papers, Church papers, Announcements, Financial papers, Citizenship papers, Health documents, Licenses, Education, Memberships, Newspaper articles and clippings, Books and Albums.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
41.  
What will happen to our research if something happens to us? Will your research be saved or tossed in the trash? Decide where your research should go after your passing.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
42.  
Just because a document is old does not mean the information is accurate for your ancestor. Consider when it was created and for what purpose.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
43.  
If your goal is to collect information on one surname, expect to collect lots of paperwork.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
44.  
Broaden your horizons - seek out others who are researching your surnames and in the same time periods and locations.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
45.  
Sometmes you need to research collaterally to find where the family settled. Look for their records in the Census.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
46.  
Stop looking for that "Magic" document to confirm that "gut" feeling and look at what you have.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
47.  
If your supporting documentation does not fit together, it probably is not the right family.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
48.  
Avoid forming a theory and never changing it. Remember the three "R's": Rethink - Reanalyze - Redo!
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
49.  
Consult other documents to help avoid errors and confirm the information you have found. Look at everything you can possibly find and don't forget to source your information.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
50.  
It's okay to prove something incorrect.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]